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dunefreak

Ways to stay alive at Dumont

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When you look at the bad accidents and fatalities that have happened at Dumont, they are almost always very easily preventable. Usually it's just one simple mistake that was made like not wearing safety gear or making a very bad judgement call. With the season upon us, we could all use some safety tip refreshers so let's get a list going.

Always have a spotter when jumping in areas where you don't have a clear, wide open view of your landing. This goes for everyone. Stay alert and stay alive this season, everyone!

They may sound redundant, but these things should never be overlooked or forgotten about. I'll be making sure these are posted on our social media pages as well.

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Great thread Pete!

One thing that was said to me years ago was actually about power tools, but I apply it anywhere that I am doing anything where I can get hurt.

"The minute you get comfortable with a tool, put it down and walk away! You have now entered the area of making a mistake that can and almost certainly will hurt you!"

I feel the same goes for the dunes, and many other things for that matter. Once you become comfortable with danger, you start letting certain things slide and not paying full attention, that's when accidents happen.

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Know your limits, don' try to be joe cool and push things passed your skill level...Not only does it put you at risk it puts other innocents around you at risk. It's not just you out there!

Great thread Pete!

One thing that was said to me years ago was actually about power tools, but I apply it anywhere that I am doing anything where I can get hurt.

"The minute you get comfortable with a tool, put it down and walk away! You have now entered the area of making a mistake that can and almost certainly will hurt you!"

I feel the same goes for the dunes, and many other things for that matter. Once you become comfortable with danger, you start letting certain things slide and not paying full attention, that's when accidents happen.

Agreed, A wise man once told me when I bought my first street bike at 18...The second this bike doesn't scare you, sell it. Now by no means am I saying sell your toys..but never think you're invincible, a little fear is ok, it keeps your alert and doesn't let you get complacent. Be safe guys and girls! Live to ride another day...

Edited by DuNe~Rydher

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Thanks guys. Just trying to look at the most commonly made mistakes in hopes that we could make those things even more common knowledge in the community. Every time I see a fatality happen out there it is always caused by something so easily avoided. I didn't want to post this in the last fatal thread, but a simple seat belt would have saved that kid in the RZR. He wasn't strapped in and wasn't wearing a helmet. That is info directly from the CHP. How anyone could get into one of those things and feel safe without wearing a belt is beyond me. Heck, I even buckle up just to drive over to a friend's camp or vendor row. I mean no disrespect in any way to the fallen duner(s). I am not afraid to admit that when I look back, I have made some stupid choices in my earlier days of partying at the dunes and have been very lucky to return to camp. I'm just trying to take what experiences we've all had in the dunes and turn them into something positive that might help others. Keep the tips coming.

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A couple of years ago I had a kid on a quad jump over my rail as i was getting ready to crest a dune...scared the crap out of me. Funny thing though is that I was the 2nd car in line and he still went through with the jump after seeing the first car flop over. I ran him down and educated him on the benefits of having a spotter.

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If your having trouble keeping up with a group don't drive/ride above your ability. cut the corners to keep up. I can keep up with the fastest rails in my rzr by doing this.

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If you wear a helmet in a sandcar, WEAR A NECK BRACE so you don't break your neck from the weight of the helmet,

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this might seem silly but happened 2 years ago, educate your kids on sand car width, if a sand car motor is running stay away from them while they are parked can, clutch foot can slip, car can leap into gear, ect,

Paddle tire not forgiving,

anyway story is that at comp hill at night, back passengers said go up comp hill, as them where taking off, passenger in the back waving to 8 year old boy that, this was the first time to Dumont

he ran up to say by at the same time the car was taking off and he was standing to close and the paddle tire grabbed his foot and broke his leg,

What you should take away from this is, the cars are big and hard to see around, if one is running keep your distance, even if it is parked,

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I suggest not doing any night time Dune runs. Even the most experience duners will stay in camp at Night. Dumont is no Joke and can turn a night run into the last. Also by night time most Duners have had their share of the can of man. Just my opinion. Glamis and other riding areas dont compare to the steep dunes at Dumont. Know your limits

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I will say just about 80% of the night rides I have broke the Car, -- Reverse in a 2D, 3 spindles, and one motor

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I suggest not doing any night time Dune runs. Even the most experience duners will stay in camp at Night. Dumont is no Joke and can turn a night run into the last. Also by night time most Duners have had their share of the can of man. Just my opinion. Glamis and other riding areas dont compare to the steep dunes at Dumont. Know your limits

Very true, I have a good time cruising at night in Glamis, Dumont is a different beast all together at night.

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Just thought I would add a major safety tip for all riders. Don't ride beyond your skill level. A lot of us seasoned veterans can drive at a very smooth fast pace. If your struggling to keep up then its time to slow down. I remind everyone that its not a race. The dunes were here before us and will be here after us.

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I suggest not doing any night time Dune runs. Even the most experience duners will stay in camp at Night. Dumont is no Joke and can turn a night run into the last. Also by night time most Duners have had their share of the can of man. Just my opinion. Glamis and other riding areas dont compare to the steep dunes at Dumont. Know your limits

I haven't broke anything, but I sure get lost at night. Especially if there is no moon.

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CPR is great to know (we do training here at work every two years) but the thing you have to remember when making the decision to give someone CPR is that once you start...you can NOT stop until said person comes around or an EMT is there to relieve you (there is a law I believe for this)...you can not make the decision on saying "This person isn't going to make it, so I will just stop". I think longest CPR session was around 20some hrs with 4 or 5 people, they just kept alternating.

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The fun part of riding in dunes in the dark is getting lost. The task is finding back to camp.

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Buy a good small first aid kit with a space blanket (sand is cold when your lying on it) and other type of emergency items such as clot stop , it can save someones life if they have a head wound or bad cut. Remember it can take up to several hours to get medical help out there so you may be the only thing that may keep them alive. I always wanted to supplement my first aid knowledge but never could find a class that wasn't long and drawn out to just learn the basics of preventing shock, stopping bleeding and CPR. May be a good thing to have knowledge of. You never know what your going to come across while out duning.

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CPR is great to know (we do training here at work every two years) but the thing you have to remember when making the decision to give someone CPR is that once you start...you can NOT stop until said person comes around or an EMT is there to relieve you (there is a law I believe for this)...you can not make the decision on saying "This person isn't going to make it, so I will just stop". I think longest CPR session was around 20some hrs with 4 or 5 people, they just kept alternating.

There is no law against someone stopping as long as they are NOT a paid or volunteer provider, the general public is covered under the "good Samaritan law" which releases the general public against any liabilities as long as they are acting in the best interest of the injured person. It was enacted to encourage the public to initiate and provide some care until EMS providers arrive..... Now if they (professional EMS providers) assume care and CPR is continued, then they must have permission from a physician to stop.

Edited by FireKracker

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Slow down around camps (the law is 15 mph within 50 feet). Kids are cruising around honing their riding skills and usually have their own hands full in doing so. That being said, they aren't the best at paying attention to their surroundings and are certainly not watching for an a$$hat driving by wide open.

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Great post!! Always take the time to relearn the dunes. They can change drastically from season to season or between trips. My families first ride every trip is a nice cruise around the dunes in daylight looking for hazards to avoid. Once we feel comfortable with the lines we rip it up!

If you go on big Holiday weekends, ride early then just chill and enjoy the sights.

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